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Artist wants to make diamonds out of smog

New device cleans the air, produces diamond jewelry Imagine a device capable of sucking pollution out of the air that your breathe and converting it into diamond rings or fancy cufflinks – then stop imagining, because that’s exactly a Dutch artist by the name of Daan Roosegaarde is trying to accomplish. According to Popular Science, Roosegaarde is working on a device known as the “Smog Free Tower”, which is said to be inspired by the air...

Little funny gamster

Happy hamsters more likely to try new things

Hamsters aren’t as emotive as some of our other companions, so it can be difficult to tell if they’re happy. Thankfully, a new study out of the United Kingdom is helping put rodent fans to rest. According to Phys.org, Researchers Emily Bethell and Nicola Koyama from John Moores University in the U.K. wanted to see if they could determine a hamster’s feelings through how they reacted to cage conditions. Researchers used what scientists call judgment bias...

cecil lion

Cecil the lion is slaughtered, his six cubs might die as well

Cecil was no ordinary lion. He was Africa’s most famous lion and his brutal killing has caused outrage around the world. Thirteen-year-old Cecil, with his distinctive black mane, was a big tourist draw at Zimbabwe's Hwange National Park. He was part of research project by scientists from UK’s Oxford University and wore a GPS so his movements could be tracked. Hunter admits killing, denies acting illegally Sadly, Cecil was killed by an American dentist from Minneapolis....

grizzly hair

Grizzly diet and mercury levels revealed in single hair

By firing a laser beam down the length of a single grizzly hair, scientists can now find out what the bear has been eating and the amount of trace metals such as mercury, copper, and zinc in its diet. The new technique uses a mass spectrometer to analyze the gases as the laser vaporizes each location while it zaps through the hair. Hair is mainly protein, including a lot of the fibrous protein keratin, and...

loggerhead sharks

Sea turtles don’t avoid sharks in ‘landscape of fear’

Biologists call it the “landscape of fear” model. According to the theory, when a prey species moves into an area with a high risk of predation, it will change its behavior to reduce that risk. But until now, the model has never been thoroughly tested on highly migratory ocean species. A new collaborative study led by scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science & Abess Center for Ecosystem...

snotbot drone

‘Snotbot’ drones collect whale snot samples

The conservation group Ocean Alliance is reportedly working on a new project that’s snot for the faint of heart: Drones that would fly over the surface of water in order to collect samples of the mucus expelled from whales’ blowholes. Ocean Alliance is calling the drones “Snotbots” and is developing them with the assistance of a team from the Olin College of Engineering, according to NYC Today. They are also seeking the public’s help via...

mayan panels

Mayan hieroglyphs reveal ‘New World Order’ arrival

Three well-preserved Mayan panels recently discovered in Guatemala are offering scientists with essential new data on the brutal rivalry between two Maya superpowers that occurred during the height of the empire around 1,500 years ago. The panels were found in the archeological site known as El Achiotal, which was founded in the 5th century AD and is also around 12 miles east of the Mayan royal palace of La Corona, which now sits as ruins. Researcher...

four-legged snake

Researchers discover fossil of four-legged snake

Researchers have discovered fossils belonging to a 113-million-year-old, four-legged snake that they believe is a direct ancestor to modern-day slithering serpents, and appears to indicate that the reptiles evolved from burrowing ancestors, not marine-based ones. The specimen, which is described in the latest edition of the journal Science, has been given the name Tetrapodophis amplectus. It is believed to have lived between 146 to 100 million years ago during the Early Cretaceous period and has...

mammoths wiped out

Mammoths most likely wiped out by abrupt climate change

Widely-held theories have pegged severe cold snaps as the primary reason mammoths, giant sloths and other large ‘megafauna’ animals were wiped out during the last ice age about 60,000 to 12,000 years ago. However, a new study published in the journal Science revealed unusual warm spells may have driven megafauna extinctions more than cold snaps. "This abrupt warming had a profound impact on climate that caused marked shifts in global rainfall and vegetation patterns," study author...

musical preference

Your musical preference gives insight into how you think

In perhaps a not entirely shocking revelation, a study out of Cambridge found that your musical preferences can give insights into how you think. The study focused on a particular psychological theory of personality known as the Empathizing-Systemizing (E-S) Theory. This theory divides the world into groups depending on whether they tend to empathize (they are driven to recognize and react to the thoughts and feelings of others) or systematize (they are driven to understand and...