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Artist wants to make diamonds out of smog

New device cleans the air, produces diamond jewelry Imagine a device capable of sucking pollution out of the air that your breathe and converting it into diamond rings or fancy cufflinks – then stop imagining, because that’s exactly a Dutch artist by the name of Daan Roosegaarde is trying to accomplish. According to Popular Science, Roosegaarde is working on a device known as the “Smog Free Tower”, which is said to be inspired by the air...

Little funny gamster

Happy hamsters more likely to try new things

Hamsters aren’t as emotive as some of our other companions, so it can be difficult to tell if they’re happy. Thankfully, a new study out of the United Kingdom is helping put rodent fans to rest. According to Phys.org, Researchers Emily Bethell and Nicola Koyama from John Moores University in the U.K. wanted to see if they could determine a hamster’s feelings through how they reacted to cage conditions. Researchers used what scientists call judgment bias...

arthritis high intensity

High-intensity workouts may ease arthritis pain

Arthritis is a daily struggle for millions of Americans, but a pilot study out of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology has found that high-intensity exercise may help ease their pain. People with arthritis often have decreased endurance on top of weakness and loss of movement, but previous research offered some hope. “Previously, studies have showed that moderate intensity work-out sessions can help improve endurance without inducing pain or inflammation, or damaging joints,” said Anja...

prostate cancer

Black men have double the risk for prostate cancer, study finds

Black men living in England are twice as likely as being diagnosed with and dying as a result of prostate cancer in compared to white men, researchers from Public Health England and Prostate Cancer UK report in the Thursday’s edition of the journal BMC Medicine. Similarly, lead author Alison Cooper and her colleagues report that Asian men are approximately half as likely as white men to develop or die as a result of prostate cancer....

armadillo leprosy

If you don't want leprosy, stay away from armadillos

Leprosy, though usually associated with the ancient world, is still a prevalent disease today, especially in the United States. But Florida has reached a high of nine causes so far in 2015, leading researchers to wonder how exactly the disease is spreading. Leprosy—also known as Hansen’s Disease—currently affects around 6,500 U.S. residents, and it takes years to correctly diagnose and treat. However, despite this high number, about 95% of the human population is not susceptible...

braille smartwatch

South Korean startup launches first Braille smartwatch

Thanks largely to the release of the Apple Watch, smartwatch sales have increased more than 400 percent over the past year, but as handy as it might be to be able to read texts or obtain directions from a wrist device, one key demographic remains underserved: the blind. According to Popular Science, one South Korean startup is looking to change that by creating the first Braille smartwatch. The device is known as Dot, and works by using...

Kindergarten children eating lunch

Schools are starting to offer healthier lunches

University of Michigan researchers found that many middle and high schools following the National School Lunch Program are starting to serve much healthier lunches than they did in the past. According to ScienceDaily, NSLP is a “federally assisted meal program in which students in participating schools can receive a nutritious lunch every school day.” This program was made to “provide adequate nutrition to low-income children” since the meals are free or at a reduced price. For...

cecil lion

Cecil the lion is slaughtered, his six cubs might die as well

Cecil was no ordinary lion. He was Africa’s most famous lion and his brutal killing has caused outrage around the world. Thirteen-year-old Cecil, with his distinctive black mane, was a big tourist draw at Zimbabwe's Hwange National Park. He was part of research project by scientists from UK’s Oxford University and wore a GPS so his movements could be tracked. Hunter admits killing, denies acting illegally Sadly, Cecil was killed by an American dentist from Minneapolis....

grizzly hair

Grizzly diet and mercury levels revealed in single hair

By firing a laser beam down the length of a single grizzly hair, scientists can now find out what the bear has been eating and the amount of trace metals such as mercury, copper, and zinc in its diet. The new technique uses a mass spectrometer to analyze the gases as the laser vaporizes each location while it zaps through the hair. Hair is mainly protein, including a lot of the fibrous protein keratin, and...

spaceship two crash

How a pilot error caused Virgin spaceship crash

An investigation has revealed the cause behind the deadly Virgin Galactic spaceship crash that took place ten months ago: a structural failure caused by the co-pilot prematurely unlocking the braking system. The investigation, conducted by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), determined the aerodynamic forces that resulted from the brakes being deployed ultimately resulted in Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo being torn apart over the Mojave Desert. The accident caused the death of the co-pilot, but the...